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Rheological Analysis of Multiphase Fluids using a Modified Cylinder Geometry

Multiphase systems such as emulsions and slurries have long been of great practical interest due to their widespread presence in everyday life. They are of importance in upstream oil and gas industry, paint industry, polymer industry, pharmaceutical industry and food industry. These multiphase systems can be stable or unstable depending on several factors such as the presence of surfactants or the shear conditions. The experimental setup consisted of an Anton Paar MCR rheometer, a 150 bar Pressure Cell device, a Liquid Temperature Control device and the Mod. C and Conv. C cup-and-bob geometries.

Introduction

Multiphase systems such as emulsions and slurries have long been of great practical interest due to their widespread presence in everyday life. They are of importance in upstream oil and gas industry, paint industry, polymer industry, pharmaceutical industry and food industry. These multiphase systems can be stable or unstable depending on several factors such as the presence of surfactants or the shear conditions.

Knowledge of the in situ dynamic rheological properties of multiphase systems, particularly during the crucial phase of emulsion formation, are necessary for the proper design of various operations (processing, transport, storage, etc.). However, these measurements are not possible using conventional geometries due to insufficient mixing in situ. Thus, the current methodology used to measure the rheological properties of emulsions and slurries involves creating them during a separate premixing phase. The emulsion formed at the end of mixing is then transferred to the cup-and-bob geometry of the rheometer. The values of viscosities are then measured for different shear rates.

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