Investigation of Morphology and Mechanical Properties of Nanofiber Scaffolds for Biomedical Applications by Atomic Force Microscopy

Using current innovative techniques for analysis of scaffolds is opening the way to prepare biomimetic polymer substrates able to modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, or enhancement of tissue function. In this report we demonstrate the use of Tosca 400 AFM for analysis of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds.

Introduction

Poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) has attracted considerable interest as a base material for biomedical applications due to its: (i) biocompatibility; (ii) biodegradability (depending on the molecular weight); (iii) approval for clinical use in humans by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA); (iv) ability for surface modification to provide better interaction with biological cells/tissues; and (v) suitability for export to countries and cultures where implantation of animal-derived products is unpopular. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of current innovative techniques for scaffolds and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to prepare biomimetic PCL substrates able to modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, or enhancement of tissue function.[1] In this report, we use Tosca 400 atomic force microscope for investigating the scaffold properties.

References

  1. Gianluca Ciardelli, Valeria Chiono, Giovanni Vozzi, Mariano Pracella, Arti Ahluwalia, Niccoletta Barbani, Caterina Cristallini and Paolo Giusti. “Blends of Poly-( E-caprolactone ) and Polysaccharides in Tissue Engineering Applications.” Biomacromolecules 2005, 6, 1961-1976 

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